Environment-friendly anode plant opened in Mosjøen – abolishing reversion of Elkem's power stations important for future investment in Norway

Norwegian prime minister Jens Stoltenberg performed the official opening today of the new anode plant built by Alcoa and Elkem Aluminium at Mosjøen in northern Norway.

Ranked as one of the world’s largest and most environment-friendly facilities of its type, the plant has an annual capacity of 300 000 tonnes and provides 100 new jobs.

A total of NOK 6 billion has been invested in industrial development at Mosjøen in the 2000-07 period, including NOK 3 billion in Mosjøen Anode.

“This new facility demonstrates that the industry is willing to be environment-friendly both in its thinking and its commitments,” says John G Thuestad, chief executive of Elkem.

“Local Norwegian environmental technology could mean a lot for global climate developments. Increased demand for aluminium has been prompted in part by the desire for lighter means of transport in order to reduce greenhouse emissions.”

A joint venture between Elkem and Alcoa, the plant began production on 10 May. It has already delivered its first anodes to Elkem Aluminium Mosjøen, while Fjaardal in Iceland will receive its first delivery in September. With anodes from this plant, Elkem Aluminium Mosjøen will be able to reduce its production costs significantly and strengthen its competitiveness.

Elkem is investing heavily in Norway, with NOK 2 billion being spent on a new hydropower station in Sauda and more than NOK 3 billion for Elkem Solar’s Kristiansand plant in addition to Mosjøen Anode.
 In addition comes a total of NOK 3 billion in completed capital spending at the aluminium plants in Lista and Mosjøen.
“Long-term availability of electricity is crucial for achieving the most forward-looking and innovative industrial commitments in Norway,” emphasises Mr Thuestad.
“The government’s proposed new reversion system for hydropower stations would eliminate Elkem’s own generating facilities as a basis for a continued commitment to solar energy and environment-friendly metal production in Norway.
“Only six per cent of all Norwegian hydropower stations are subject to reversion to the state. All are owned by industry and used in industrial production.
“Eliminating reversion terms for these facilities is necessary to ensure not only that the new regime accords with the European Economic Area agreement but also that we can continue to develop industry in Norway.”


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